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Finding A Stroller for Kids Over 15 kg

January 7, 2012 1 comment

Strollers or prams are a necessity in Singapore if you have a toddler or any kid below 6 years old.  In fact, I have seen even older kids still riding the strollers. Why? Because most of us would probably be taking the public transport and most of these are located in specific places which means we need to walk quite long distances. Going places like Botanical Garden or Sentosa, you would not have an easy-to-find public transport to hail to bring you three blocks away.  With malling as a past time, the more a stroller is needed if you would like everyone in the family to enjoy the day.

Yanna’s first stroller was bought in the Philippines worth around SGD 200 and was of premier class.  It even had a detachable baby basket.  This kind of stroller is something you only see in movies. Hehe.

When my family followed to Singapore before Yanna was 6 months, they brought along this stroller and her crib.  Not only because it would have been more expensive to buy a new one but because I tried to look for its equivalent and did not find anything suitable.

As  we got used to the country, we learned the “dos and don’ts” of family making trips here and there.  It is definitely a must to bring stroller on trips.  But we found the stroller bulky as it did not fold compact enough.  Also, it did not have a convenient carrying mechanism that I had to carry it with my two hands if I need to do it safely.  In short, it is not your typical “portable” easy-to-fold stroller.

 

Yanna’s first stroller was pretty but bulky

It was hard to accept that the stroller was not good enough because it was expensive even by Singapore standards.  But the most practical thing to do was buy a more convenient one.  My initial knowledge of strollers in Singapore was that they were expensive.  The brands that I would see everywhere were Combi and Maclaren.  When I did window shopping one day, I was surprised at the prices! They ranged between SGD 200-400.  But I believed there were cheaper ones.  I only need one that could carry my daughter when we go out and one that is easy-to-fold-and-carry.  Good thing, we found them in the right place.  We went to Giant and found an array of cheap but pretty much decent carriers. We bought a SGD 39 pram.

We used this for almost two years and without a regret.  Our SGD 39 was value-for-money.  The only thing that did not work well with this stroller was that it did not have a good wheel balance that when you turn it on one side, one wheel’s direction does not necessarily turn the same way.  But it did not matter because at the end of the day, it follows since you have one human pushing it. Also, one wheel would be detached and fall from time to time- to our amusement. Thankfully, we never lost that wheel at all.  This stroller has traveled Hongkong, Macau and Kuala Lumpur.  Now time has come when our dear Yanna has grown too heavy for it, at 15 kilograms, and we can feel that it is slowly giving in.  We did not want to wait for it to collapse and so we started our hunt for a new stroller.  The challenge is that most strollers were made to carry 15 kg child. From the sources we knew, we did not find one that had the capacity of over that weight.  this time we were not looking for a stroller to just hang by and carry our daughter.  It had to be sturdy, of good quality, and easy-to-carry features.  We would probably use it in the next two years. Our budget in our mind was between SGD 75 to 150- probably coming from the SGD 30 price, it was hard to go higher.

Light and handy, enough for lightweight toddlers

Easy to carry but need to have a good grip

We were disappointed with going back to Giant because we did not find any that could carry our requirement and also because there was not much.  After this failed trip, my wife discovered a Mothercare branch in Harbourfront where there is a wide array of strollers. We found the expensive strollers all lined up beautifully. We found one that we like, in terms of looks and function but the price is cumbersome – SGD 598.  My wife did not seem convinced at first.  But there was not much of a choice.  We found a simple looking stroller that looked sturdy but turned out to cost around SGD 550 and could only carry up to 15 kg.  We need a heavy duty stroller that can carry Yanna’s size and one that would last 2-3 years more. So where else do we go?

Baby Jogger City Mini Single

Comfy for Big Sized Kiddies

Good looking

Looks bulky in size but easy to carry

Tip to parents: Buy a stroller for long-term foreseeing the capability even up to 20 kg. In case you already bought but need to buy a new one for some reason as we did, consider the following;

1.  How long else will the kid need the stroller.  They would typically need it until 6-7 years old- in Singapore.

2. How much is your budget. If you are really on a shoe-string-budget and your kid is still small, buy the cheaper ones like what we had.  It could last two years depending on how fast your kid grows.  And you won’t regret it because the cost is not even 10% of what it would cost when you buy a new one.  Also, you would have saved some years of depreciation if you had to buy another one that is expensive.

It showed to be a happy ending for our stroller hunting

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Check out other options and accessories (click images below)

Note: The image links above are affiliate links. The review made on this post is independent and only based on our experiences.  Everything shared in this blog are honest reviews and I do not recommend anything that I do not believe in.

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Categories: Parenting, Shopping

The Coach Told Me, "Go Home!"

December 19, 2011 5 comments

Back in high school, I attempted to tryout on varsity track and field in my desperation to be exempted from the Youth Development Training (YDT), a compulsory pre-military training in school required back then. Much of that exercise was conducted on the open school field. Everybody loathed exposure to sun. Being exempted was somewhat a privilege and a status symbol, so to speak, specially if you were part of the varsity teams- whichever sport that might be. When I learned about the tryout, I immediately registered myself without any real preparation. All I knew was that I could jog the long distance for a while. So when the day came, I did not even know which event I should join but anyway decided that one which required long-distance running. I mustered my best to finish but it was not good enough and I just heard the coach say “Go home!”. After that fast long distance run, I stopped and somewhat felt nauseous and vomitted. One unforgettable experience I never told anyone until now. Whew.

Learning from that, I told myself I want to train and be prepared for the following year and get in the varsity. One thing for sure was I discovered one of the few non-ball sports that I could do and enjoy. However, I ended up not pursuing running as a competitive sport but was satisfied to keep it on the side as a fun and healthy activity.  At some point it crossed my mind to join a race and some day dreaming to be in Milo Marathon. But all of that ended in the head. Haha.

Many years passed. It was still on my mind. For more than ten years, I managed to have a semi-healthy lifestyle by managing some balanced diet and active lifestyle – mmm let’s say every half of the year each time. Running on the treadmill was still part of the routine and the thought would still come- how about joining a race? This never came close to happening until I got to Singapore. The Standard Chartered Marathon was pretty much well publicized. Not to mention the options of things to do around the country, I guess this event resonated in my mind. After much procrastination, I decided to give it a try on the start of my third year here (January 2011). I had to undergo the gruesome challenge of discipline (not to postpone my scheduled trainings) and managing time with work, family and other commitments.  A few weeks before the marathon, I already realized that the chances of finishing the marathon was slim.  Not that I gave up on the hope but at the rate I performed while training and problematic about my runner’s knee tendency, I had to be realistic. I slowed down my pace not wanting to end up with any serious injury.  No, i will not sacrifice everything for this.  Well, it’s not a number one priority. What was important to me was to start something and see how far I can go.  So the final moment came: 4 December, 5:00 a.m.

Starting the race with a smile

At the start of the race, it was an accomplishment. “This is it!”, I thought.

10 kilometer milestone

20 km milestone- very hopeful at this stage as I was still feeling the energy!

I took things one step at a time.  I first thought of the first 5 kilometers; then the next 5; and so on.

Nothing is sweeter than to be with my angel.

I managed to run about 26 kilometers. Not bad for a start.   Next year, I will be more competitive but realistic. I’ll probably do 5 or 10 kilometers.

What's Up On Arab Street?

December 10, 2011 4 comments

It was said that the street was so called because the area used to be owned by an Arab and it was the site of an Arab kampong.  What I knew about Arab Street is that there is that Queen Street Bus Terminal close by to take you to Johor, Malaysia.  Also, there’s a nearby wholesale market for all sorts of spices and stuff.  I remember passing through this area few times- jogging or riding the bus to Johor.  But wait, there’s the other side of this street!  It turned out to be a bargain place like Divisoria in the Philippines- to a lesser degree.

Corner leading to Arab street

Last year, in search for cheap Christmas garland, my wife discovered that good priced ones were sold in this area.  What was sold at SGD 30 elsewhere, was sold here for SGD 15! But that’s old news.  We visited the lone store concentrated on selling Christmas stuff and was selling the same garland for SGD 30 plus, the same price elsewhere.  They must have discovered the treasure in this item.

Christmas garland bringing more Christmas air

Walking through the street is a delight for you do not see too many merchandise displayed beyond the stores- on the sidewalk that is.  It is reminiscent of Quiapo, Central Market and Divisoria, what have you.  But again, with  a higher standard of setting from Singapore’s perspective – cleaner, more organized and safe.  Wholesale and retail stores with a huge inventory of items make it easier for you to find what you’re looking for.

Array of stores on Arab Street

There’s a basket shop – nice to see but quality is so-so similar to what you find in some underpass Quiapo stalls.

Basketry

We only found one Christmas decor and trinkets shop in the middle of the street. Good variety of stuff.

Wide selection of Christmas stuff

Fabrics is not my thing. In case you rave for this, this is one place to be.

Overflow of textile merchandise

For smokers, there’s a restaurant that has this hookah or shisha pipes in some tables.  And they also sell the pipes!

Warning: Smoking a tobacco-based Hookah is as dangerous as smoking cigarettes

Other stores are found here if you need ribbons, tapes etc.

Supplies store

If you are the adventurer type, it’s worth going to this place and have a look at what’s going on here 🙂

Categories: Shopping

What’s Up On Arab Street?

December 10, 2011 6 comments

It was said that the street was so called because the area used to be owned by an Arab and it was the site of an Arab kampong.  What I knew about Arab Street is that there is that Queen Street Bus Terminal close by to take you to Johor, Malaysia.  Also, there’s a nearby wholesale market for all sorts of spices and stuff.  I remember passing through this area few times- jogging or riding the bus to Johor.  But wait, there’s the other side of this street!  It turned out to be a bargain place like Divisoria in the Philippines- to a lesser degree.

Corner leading to Arab street

Last year, in search for cheap Christmas garland, my wife discovered that good priced ones were sold in this area.  What was sold at SGD 30 elsewhere, was sold here for SGD 15! But that’s old news.  We visited the lone store concentrated on selling Christmas stuff and was selling the same garland for SGD 30 plus, the same price elsewhere.  They must have discovered the treasure in this item.

Christmas garland bringing more Christmas air

Walking through the street is a delight for you do not see too many merchandise displayed beyond the stores- on the sidewalk that is.  It is reminiscent of Quiapo, Central Market and Divisoria, what have you.  But again, with  a higher standard of setting from Singapore’s perspective – cleaner, more organized and safe.  Wholesale and retail stores with a huge inventory of items make it easier for you to find what you’re looking for.

Array of stores on Arab Street

There’s a basket shop – nice to see but quality is so-so similar to what you find in some underpass Quiapo stalls.

Basketry

We only found one Christmas decor and trinkets shop in the middle of the street. Good variety of stuff.

Wide selection of Christmas stuff

Fabrics is not my thing. In case you rave for this, this is one place to be.

Overflow of textile merchandise

For smokers, there’s a restaurant that has this hookah or shisha pipes in some tables.  And they also sell the pipes!

Warning: Smoking a tobacco-based Hookah is as dangerous as smoking cigarettes

Other stores are found here if you need ribbons, tapes etc.

Supplies store

If you are the adventurer type, it’s worth going to this place and have a look at what’s going on here 🙂

Categories: Living In Singapore

Where Did You Buy Your Christmas Decor?

November 14, 2011 Leave a comment

In the Philippines, September is the time when the so-called “-ber months” commence.  The presence of Christmas is starting to be felt with the airing of Christmas carols and putting up of decor.    Television networks join the hype with their Christmas countdown too.  Following this custom, as early as October, our Christmas tree had been assembled by my wife, who fancies a lot about Christmas stuff.  Putting together a collection of Christmas home decor is not an easy task in Singapore. Why? For discriminating tastes, it is not easy to find a good bunch of these perhaps because Christmas is valued differently here.  It’s easy to find Christmas trees everywhere in different colors (such as black) and shapes but not your perfect pine in the right proportions.

We found one at Carrefour and turned out to be most costly in that store (around SGD 110). But I guess, it’s worth it because we will use it for several years anyway.  We have not attempted to go to high-end stores so this should be the best price for the best Christmas tree.  We did not find it in our recent visit to Carrefour Plaza Singapore so I guess you need to scour around other branches.

First of all, your Christmas tree is never close to the real if there are no pine cones.  You can easily pick numerous cones to complete this green structure on the round where Pine trees stand in the nearest neighbourhood.

For the other tree’s trinkets and decor, you can find bargains in many places but surely nothing can beat Daiso’s two dollar sets.

Coffee table Christmas candles (in progress)

Candles (less than SGD 20 for three)from Ikea; Glass plate (gift) from Tang’s; cones from the neighbourhood;
ribbons from the supplies store.

Christmas garland

Artificial garland (branches with leaves only) from a store in Arab Street– bought at bargain SGD 15 two years ago but now selling at SGD 38! This would be costing the same or slightly higher in superstores.

Santa’s socks

from Daiso, SGD 2.

Don’t wait for the last-minute to decorate your house with Christmas stuff.  Best time to start this is on 1st Sunday of Advent which happens on 4 December when we start preparing for the joyous occasion in church.  It helps to attune the earthly realm with the spiritual. 😉

Categories: Shopping

Moments: Our View of the National Day

August 25, 2011 1 comment

National Day view from our window.

August 9 is Singapore’s National Day, a public holiday commemorating its independence.  We chose to stay for most part of the daytime at home but viewed a part of the celebration up in the sky 😉

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Categories: Living In Singapore

Moments: Walk At The Botanical Gardens

August 21, 2011 1 comment
It wasn’t our first time to visit the Botanical Gardens.  It is certianly a luxury else where to be able to get to a beautiful park on impulse within 15 minutes from home.  A good way to spend Saturday family day.

Expanse of greenery

Pavilions where family can bond.

Communing with nature in man-made garden.

Categories: Living In Singapore
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