Home > Self-Help > Focus On Your Work! The Pomodoro Technique (via An Associate’s Mind)

Focus On Your Work! The Pomodoro Technique (via An Associate’s Mind)

From Rob's Desk

Many of us like to be multi-taskers.  In our jobs, even if we are not inclined to it, many times we find ourselves without a choice.  The downside is that we can lose focus and get disoriented on which one is the priority.  Add to that, delays from another party can hold us back and slow us down.  I have tried many options like using my Outlook reminder every 15 minutes with the subject “Focus!” as a reminder. Well, this technique seems similar to what I unearthed in Freshly Pressed.  Sometimes we need a sound or a pat on the back to tell us “Move, move, move to the next task!”

The Pomodoro Technique Sometimes one of the most difficult problems people face is actually putting aside the time to work. People often attempt to multi-task multiple projects at one time while simultaneously juggling email, Twitter, etc. Frankly, it’s an incredibly ineffective method in which to conduct your work. I’ve long preferred a system of time management known as the Pomodoro Technique. Choose a task to be accomplished Set the Pomodoro to 25 minutes (the Pomod … Read More

via An Associate’s Mind

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Categories: Self-Help
  1. Ben
    May 17, 2011 at 2:31 pm

    Thanks for the share :]

  2. May 18, 2011 at 12:45 pm

    I agree with you,I much appreciate this technique it maybe a bit of conventional but It seems to work more effectively..
    nice one..

  3. Rey
    May 20, 2011 at 8:19 am

    There are a lot of techniques to manage time more effectively and this is just one of them. The Pomodoro technique works pretty well, just make sure you are alone and no one else can distract you. The problem, oftentimes, are the people around you that asks for assistance at the time you are focusing on a priority. Tactfully letting them know that you are busy sometimes work. But if it doesn’t, just close your door or just bring your laptop somewhere else were distractions are nil.

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